SOLD OUT for 2020-- Blue Orchard Mason Bee Habitat Boards- NEW
SOLD OUT for 2020-- Blue Orchard Mason Bee Habitat Boards- NEW
SOLD OUT for 2020-- Blue Orchard Mason Bee Habitat Boards- NEW
SOLD OUT for 2020-- Blue Orchard Mason Bee Habitat Boards- NEW

SOLD OUT for 2020-- Blue Orchard Mason Bee Habitat Boards- NEW

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SOLD OUT for 2020--

48 hole Alder Reusable Habitat Boards. Habitat boards are one of the only ways that gardeners should help house native bees. Specifically blue orchard Mason bees. You should not buy blocks of wood with holes drilled in them because you cannot access the bees inside to check for disease or other pests that may take over your habitat. Native bees only like specific types of wood such as this Alder hardwood. You should have a much higher success rate using not only these boards combined with a package of bees as well as a habitat that gets better with time. Bees like old wood and you don't have to keep buying supplies every year. It is just fine to buy these boards alone without one of the boxes that we sell and without the package of bees. You can put this habitat boards in your own box built to suit, a large metal can or somewhere a bit out of the weather. We do sell boxes that fit these exactly. I really like to combine these with sustainable reeds we sell. In the past we have had rubber bands keeping them tightly together with cardboard on the back to try and keep bad bugs such as beetles and predatory wasps out. We have now found that simple drywall putty or the painting spackle pushed into the holes slightly in the back will do wonders to protect your bees. Not only is it highly economical but it pulls apart easily when you go to inspect your bees. Why do you want to protect your bees from the back? Many different bugs will attempt to access the bees from the back. This is why we have a sealed (yet removable) back of your habitat house that we sell as well as trying to close off the back of the laminate board holes. When the bees lay their eggs they lay the females towards the back which are the most important and most prized, If you have a bad predatory bug infestation though go for most of the females and will dramatically decrease your colony. It is easy to continue to protect tour bees each year by using drywall spackle to simply fill in the back after inspecting them after the new year.